Thermalright SI-128 SE Heatsink

Overall Score

Introduction:

[IMG]xoxide_2015_25417071.gif[/IMG]

I was originally running the stock Intel cooler on the quad core processor in my HTPC.  When I saw that there was basically no hope of running it at anything other than stock clock, I started looking for a better HSF.  Then baligavinod posted this thread, and my search ended.  I decided that I was going to buy the SI-128 SE and see how it handled a quad.  When I got back to school, I purchased this fine piece from Xoxide.

Specifications and Features:
Specs:
• Dimension : L125 x W145 x H91.5 mm (heatsink only)
• Weight : 510g (Heatsink Only)
Features:
• Works optimally with a quiet, low RPM 120mm fan
• Proprietary thru-holes adopted from the HR-series to increase air flow movement
• 8mm heatpipes with high heat transfer efficiency
• Patented support bar design preventing heatsink from deformation over time
• Increased height of heatsink fins for better motherboard compatibility
• Fan blow down design helps to cool CPU surrounding
Compatibility:
 INTEL: All Intel P4 LGA775 processors
AMD: Intel Socket AM2 Athlon64 / FX / X2 / Opteron

Package Contents:
• SI-128 SE Heatsink
• Mini Wrench
• Multi-Backplate
• Mounting hardware for sockets AM2 and 775
• Anti-Vibration Strips
• Thermalright Thermal Paste
• Installation Guide

The Package was the typical Thermalright – excellent.  A clean brown box with more than ample protection for its precious contents.

[IMG]P8190001.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]P8190004.jpg[/IMG]

 

[IMG]P8190005.jpg[/IMG]

She’s not going anywhere.
[IMG]P8190017.jpg[/IMG]

This is a good shot of the 4 massive 8mm heatpipes and the “Proprietary thru-holes adopted from the HR-series to increase air flow movement”.
[IMG]P8190016.jpg[/IMG]

Here is a shot of the ”Patented support bar design preventing the heatsink from deformation over time”.
[IMG]P8190021.jpg[/IMG]

This is a lot bigger than I expected. :wideeyed: And I was actually starting to worry whether or not it was going to fit in my case. :skeptical:

[IMG]P8190012.jpg[/IMG]

The bottom looked really nice.  It is very smooth – even though you can see the machining marks.  I didn’t notice any concave or convex points in it either.
[IMG]P8190026.jpg[/IMG]

The included hardware.
[IMG]P8190038.jpg[/IMG]

The pieces needed for a socket 775 installation (minus the 4 screws in the upper right.  Those are actually for the AM2 installation set).

[IMG]P8190034.jpg[/IMG]

The AM2 components.

[IMG]P8190029.jpg[/IMG]

The all-important, and pretty sweet looking case badge!!!
[IMG]P8190039.jpg[/IMG]

120mm fan clips, Thermalright Thermal Paste and the Anti-Vibration fan strips.

Installation:
Installing this beast was a little more difficult than I was expecting coming from the TR U120E where it’s just 4 screws that are fairly simple to put in.  The TR SI-128 SE put up a little more of a fight.

[IMG]P8190060.jpg[/IMG]

 

This is the Multi-Backplate with 2 of the posts in.  The posts are secured by rubber O-rings that slip into a grove in the post, holding it in the backplate.

[IMG]P8190061.jpg[/IMG]

This picture shows how the posts sit between 2 raised points to secure the post from spinning when the screws that hold the heatsink bracket are secured.

[IMG]P8190069.jpg[/IMG]

Here is the mounting bracket on the top side.  This camera angle shows that there is just enough clearance to get over the voltage regulators.

[IMG]P8190070.jpg[/IMG]

Now both brackets are on.  The SI-128 SE has the same bracket setup as the Ultima 90.

[IMG]P8190077.jpg[/IMG]

Like a lot of the other large, aftermarket heatsinks, installation of the SI-128 SE is most easily accomplished with the motherboard out of the case (unless you have really, really small hands).
[IMG]P8190076.jpg[/IMG]

With the “SilentPipe” heatsink on the Gigabyte P35-DQ6 motherboard, there wasn’t a whole lot of clearance for this baby.  Here, the two heatsinks are actually touching.  I had to do some playing around to see just which way this would fit.  And now, after I completed all of the testing, I have it mounted a quarter turn clockwise and have bent the fins on the top tower of the northbridge heatsink so the two wouldn’t touch.  The way that it was worked fine, I turned it because if I want to stand the case up, I want the heatpipes to be running horizontally so that they are able to function better.  When the case lays flat, the orientation of the heatpipes isn’t important.

[IMG]P8190080.jpg[/IMG]

A look from the other side.  I would also like to say that the use of the included “Mini Wrench” is a must as there is no way to get a screwdriver in to tighten the screws down.  I have also noticed that the heatsink does slide around a little if you push on it, but a simple solution would be to place a washer on the top side of the mounting bracket to eat up the extra space.  Note: The movement is not bad by any means.  I just wanted to include it here as an FYI.

[IMG]P8190079.jpg[/IMG]

Showing the clearance a little more.

[IMG]P8190086.jpg[/IMG]

Now, it’s back in the case and the rest of the components are joining it.

[IMG]P8190087.jpg[/IMG]

As you can see, it’s a pretty tight fit in my case, a Gateway G6-200 that I salvaged and gave new life.  [URL="http://forum.xcpus.com/case-mods/13324-gateway-g6-200-case-mod.html"]http://forum.xcpus.com/case-mods/13324-gateway-g6-200-case-mod.html[/URL]

[IMG]P8190088.jpg[/IMG]

This is how the SI-128 SE is situated in my case now.

The Competition:

[IMG]P8190090.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]P8190091.jpg[/IMG]

Intel Stock Cooler

[IMG]P7070028.jpg[/IMG]

The stock cooler in my case.
[IMG]P8190052.jpg[/IMG]

Thermalright Ultra-120 Extreme (U120e)

[IMG]P8190064.jpg[/IMG]

The TR U120E in my case.

[IMG]P8190067.jpg[/IMG]

Doesn’t quite fit. :no: :wideeyed:
[IMG]P8190071.jpg[/IMG]

A side by side comparison between the sizes of the 3 heatsinks.
[IMG]P819072.jpg[/IM

SHARE THIS POST

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Myspace
  • Google Buzz
  • Reddit
  • Stumnleupon
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • Technorati

Leave A Response